to-train-or-not-to-train

I've lost count how many times I've been injured while in the middle of a training program. That doesn't stop me from training, no, not in the slightest. But it does require me to reassess what I can and can't do until I'm fully recovered and rehabilitated.

Take me for example. Currently, I have an irregularity of the right shoulder AC Joint consistent with degenerative change and a mild thickening of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa. What this means is that I'm experiencing subacromial impingement and bursitis. It's the same thing I went through for my left shoulder in 2007 & 2008. 

It deteriorated to the point that I had an ultrasound guided cortisone injection on Wednesday. It was only recently I confessed about my over the top fear of all things needles and here I am again, getting another one. Talk about psychological trauma. Even worse, I've had one previously before in the left shoulder, so I knew what I was in for. Yuk!

If the cortisone injection works then, all's good, and I can carry on with my training. But if it fails, and time will tell, then it's shoulder surgery for me. Hopefully not, but I have to be realistic and given my previous experience at least I know the outcome was successful.

So when we're faced with this, we have two choices. To continue on training, an amended version of course, or to stop training altogether. For me, the later just isn't an option. Every other part of my fully functioning body still requires physical training. Hell, I was up the morning after my chemotherapy treatments to walk around the block to oxygenate my body's cells and help with the healing process. If I can do that, I can certainly do this. 

Swimming was the first exercise I cut away. It was hands down the worst culprit for aggravating my shoulder, especially freestyle. Thankfully walking wasn't an issue, and I've carried on with that. Chilli (my dog) would also be most disappointed if I were to stop walking him. He needs his exercise too you know. As for the gym, well that's still possible, and thankfully I have an old shoulder rehabilitation training program I could do to help strengthen all the supporting muscles around the shoulder without further aggravating it.

Nothing's impossible, and everything's achievable provided you have an open and positive attitude. Remember Friday when I talked about flexibility,  adaptability and consistency. Well, that kind of applies here. We don't live in a perfect world so therefore we can't be perfect. We have to do the best we can, with what we've got on any given day, and this is just another one of those times when it applies.

We simply have to make do without compromising our health and fitness goals. 

What's an example of when you continued training through an injury? Feel free to share by leaving a comment below.

love-lia